HIV and the Church

// HIV&AIDS Blog

What he learned, and I was reminded, over the next few minutes is that Cryptosporidium – Crypto, for short - is often a waterborne, microscopic, hard to kill parasite that anyone can get. It lodges in the small intestine and, in most healthy humans, causes diarrhea and other symptoms (like those mentioned in the previous paragraph) for a few days. Then, it is relatively quickly cleared with only a slight possibility of recurrence. However, cryptosporidium can be extremely dangerous to people in special circumstances....
The HIV&AIDS community has been using “Getting to Zero” for the past two years to communicate its goals of: • Zero new HIV infections; • Zero AIDS-related deaths; • Zero mother-to-child transmission of HIV; and… • Zero stigma and discrimination....
December 1st, 2013, represented the 25th celebration of World AIDS Day, an event recognized worldwide and dedicated to raising awareness for those living with HIV&AIDS. Each year, Saddleback Church members come together on World AIDS Day to raise awareness, support those living with HIV and remember those who have lost their lives to AIDS....
Did you know that orphanages are damaging to children? Research shows growing up in an institution harms children emotionally, physically and developmentally. Children need the love of a family to survive and thrive....
In previous parts of this blog series, we stated that both people in our community and many Christians still live in denial about HIV&AIDS, and it is crucially important to inform denial with factual education and transform denial with theological wisdom. Nine (9) of ten (10) ways we are in denial have been covered in Parts 2a-e. In the remaining parts of this section on denial, all of us in faith communities are asked to consider how our misapprehension of the Gospel contributes to denial and what understanding a Biblical Gospel can do to help us care for people living with HIV&AIDS and their families and friends....
In previous parts of this blog series, we stated that both people in our community and many Christians still live in denial about HIV&AIDS, and it is crucially important to inform denial with factual education and transform denial with theological wisdom. Eight of ten ways we are in denial have been covered in Parts 2a-d. In the remaining parts of this section on denial, all of us in faith communities are asked to consider how our misapprehension of the Gospel contributes to denial and what understanding a Biblical Gospel can do to help us care for people living with HIV&AIDS and their families and friends....
Have you ever considered that there is a child living with HIV in the United States or around the world who is outside of parental care, waiting for a family of their own?...
Nervously twirling her fingers together she lowered her head and whispered, “I’m afraid.” Unable to hear my friend clearly over the din of the restaurant noise, at first I wasn’t quite sure what she said. Fortunately, she repeated herself, “I’m afraid. I’m four months pregnant, alone after my divorce and I’m terrified I might have AIDS.”...
In previous parts of this blog series, we stated that both people in our community and many Christians still live in denial about HIV&AIDS, and it is crucially important to inform denial with factual education and transform denial with theological wisdom. Seven of ten ways we are in denial have been covered in Parts 2a-c. In the remaining parts of this section on denial, all of us in faith communities are asked to consider how our misapprehension of the Gospel contributes to denial and what understanding a Biblical Gospel can do to help us care for people living with HIV&AIDS and their families and friends....