HIV and the Church

    // From the Blog

    Approximately 9.7 million people in low and middle-income countries are currently receiving ARVs in an attempt to treat HIV and prevent new infections. Access to ARVs has dramatically decreased the incidence of AIDS related deaths in many African countries. However, despite this advance, one in four people die during the first few months of treatment. Malnutrition plays a large part in these deaths....
    In as little as two weeks to as long as three months, signs can occur in your body, which are reactions to an HIV infection. Many, but not all people who are infected, experience flu-like symptoms, sometimes described as the “worse flu ever.” There are between nine and sixteen different symptoms experienced by people living with HIV and AIDS. Here are some of the most common, indicating early-stage HIV infection....
    Being very public about my HIV diagnosis and writing for several HIV publications, I’m constantly receiving emails from people living with HIV, telling me their stories and asking questions. One issue that comes up a lot in these communications is pregnancy....
    What he learned, and I was reminded, over the next few minutes is that Cryptosporidium – Crypto, for short - is often a waterborne, microscopic, hard to kill parasite that anyone can get. It lodges in the small intestine and, in most healthy humans, causes diarrhea and other symptoms (like those mentioned in the previous paragraph) for a few days. Then, it is relatively quickly cleared with only a slight possibility of recurrence. However, cryptosporidium can be extremely dangerous to people in special circumstances....


     
    // Featured Story

    Tim shares his story of how God has changed his life and leads him on a new path that is very different from his past choices. Tim's past now leaves him needing to know his HIV status. Tim lets us follow him as he enters the doctor's office, gets blood drawn, and as he learns whether he is HIV positive or negative.

    Click HERE to watch Tim's story.